• Greenwich NHW Network

Updated: Jun 6

Neighbourhood Watch week is here and we are delighted to announce a whole series of events online for you and your communities to participate in.


Neighbourhood Watch week is 5th-11th June and Greenwich Neighbourhood Watch Network has a online event for each of the weekdays.




Monday - We talk about connect our communities post Covid and exploring ways that we can do this with sensitivity and compassion.




Tuesday 8th June - Again Vehicle crime has been at the forefront of crimes being committed in our borough. So this workshop helps us know how to reduce the risk and also highlights the recent surge in Catalytic Converter crime.




Wednesday 9th June - We will be exploring Personal Safety. This is a topic which has also been highlighted following recent events and we would like to enable our communities to feel safer when walking our streets.




Thursday 10th June - As our communities get busier, we will indeed see a rise in Anti-Social behaviour and this workshop explains what it is and what we can proactively do to reduce the risk.



Friday 11th June - We welcome back a great speaker PC Tom Lee from the MET police Cyber Protect unit to talk about how we can identify the signs of Cyber crime, scams and understand the difference between Smishing, Phishing and Vishing.

Please not this event is from 6pm.



How you can get involved:


  • BOOK your place at any of these events, please visit our EVENTS page to book your FREE space.

  • SHARE these events with your neighbours, friends and community groups, ward councillors, schools, local policing teams etc

  • SHARE the events over your social media pages

Best wishes


GREENWICH NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK

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  • Greenwich NHW Network

Along with our Cyberhood Watch partner, Avast, we have launched a new survey to understand whether the Covid-19 pandemic has changed our attitudes towards certain aspects of cybersecurity and privacy since the first lockdown in March 2020.


The findings from the survey will be used to inform ongoing Cyberhood Watch awareness initiatives for the Neighbourhood Watch community and draw attention to important cybersecurity and privacy topics though the media to help UK citizens improve their knowledge of, and protection from, cyberthreats.


The survey of 16 questions will take you less than 5 minutes to complete and all answers are anonymous. It is open from today and will close on Sunday 27th June 2021. If you’d like to take part, please follow the link below:


https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/XSYQQTD


Thank you very much in advance for your support in the fight against cybercrime in the UK.


NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK, Central Support Team

Follow us.. ourwatch.org.uk / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn


Neighbourhoood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349

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  • Greenwich NHW Network

Hackers are trying to get access to WhatsApp accounts after stealing the identities of their victims’ contacts. Here’s how it works and what to watch out for.


First, you’ll receive an unexpected but genuine text message from WhatsApp containing a verification code. This is usually triggered when logging into the app for the first time, when you’ve been logged out, or you’re trying to log into WhatsApp from a new device.


But in the case of this scam, fraudsters have entered your number into WhatsApp themselves to try to get access to your account, triggering the verification code text.


Next, one of your WhatsApp contacts will message you via the app, usually with a story to try to persuade you to give them the verification code you’ve just received. They might say they’ve accidentally entered your number by mistake, for example.


Because the message seems to be from a relative or friend, a lot of people have been tricked into passing on the verification code, which then allows fraudsters to take over their accounts.


Once they’ve taken over, scammers might use your account in a few different ways.


What happens next?

We’ve heard that scammers have identified their victims’ closest contacts from their message history and have asked them for money or sensitive information.


They could also find out personal details about you and your contacts from your messages. This information could be used to access other important accounts, target you with more scams, or even blackmail you.


Scammers are likely to carry out the same trick with verification codes with the new set of contacts they’ve unlocked, gaining access to more and more accounts. A WhatsApp spokesperson told us:


“The safety and security of our users and their messages are really important to us. However, just like regular SMS or phone calls, it’s possible for other WhatsApp users who have your phone number to contact you.


We advise all users never to share their WhatsApp SMS verification code with others, not even friends or family. We also recommend that all users set up two-step verification for added security. For more information and resources on how to stay safe online visit our website”


How to keep your WhatsApp account safe

Don’t share your login details or verification code with anybody. Not your closest family or trusted friends.


Set up two-step verification to secure your account.


Be wary of WhatsApp messages requesting money, even if they come from your contacts. If you’re not sure, give the friend a quick call to check.


As always, if you think you may have given sensitive details, such as payment information, to fraudsters, let your bank know what’s happened immediately."


WhatsApp users who have lost access to their accounts can contact support@whatsapp.com.


Link to article from Which

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